Costume Contest, Pumpkin Decorating, Howl-A-Ween Parade

 

 

Recipe Corner: Trish’s Hot Chicken Salad

PB0111_Lemon-Basil-Chicken-Salad_lgYears ago, Ms. Patricia Summers, of Winter Haven, FL, shared this recipe with me after she served it at a luncheon while visiting her mother (a dear friend and neighbor) in Fort Lauderdale. Trish maintained she was not a good cook. But no one who has tasted any of her efforts would agree.

The original recipe called for cooking a 3-pound chicken, which was a bonus when one was left with several cups of resulting flavorful stock to freeze for future soups or any recipe calling for a good chicken stock or broth.

However, to simplify our time in the kitchen as we matured, we opted to make this savory salad with leftover or store bought moist cooked chicken (or turkey). With the ingredients on hand, this is a quick and delicious lunch or light dinner that can be assembled several hours before the final baking.

As a bonus today, you will find, following Trish’s recipe, something to entice younger budding chefs (visiting grandchildren).

2 cups moist, cooked chicken or turkey in bite-size chunks

2 cups thin-sliced celery

1 small can (about 4-1/2 ounces) chopped black olives

½ cup coarse-chopped roasted peanuts

½ teaspoon salt, or to taste

2 tablespoons grated onion

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

1 cup mayonnaise

½ cup shredded Swiss cheese

1 cup crushed potato chips

Heat oven to 400 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, combine all the ingredients except the cheese and potato chips. Pile the mixture lightly into a greased 10x7x2-inch (1-1/2-quart) casserole, or six 1-cup individual serving dishes. Sprinkle the top(s) with the cheese and potato chips.

The salad can be made ahead to this point, covered lightly and refrigerated. The individual dishes will take about 15-20 minutes to heat through and the casserole about twice that long, depending upon whether or not they were made ahead and refrigerated. It makes six servings.

Pummeled Bread for Two

In the event of inclement weather, or just to amuse, here is a recipe youngsters can execute with no supervision (cleanup is optional) and guaranteed to entertain. You can thank Jeannette Ferrary, cookbook author and former contributor to The Living Arts section of the New York Times, for this unique recipe.

8 slices (soft Wonderbread-type) supermarket white bread, crusts removed

Wash hands thoroughly. Set four bread slices in front of you in one row. Clench fists tightly and with knuckles facing each other, begin to pummel the slices. You will probably find it easier to alternate fists rather than smashing both fists down simultaneously.

When slices are completely flat, open fists and gathering up one slice at a time, roll them into tight balls like pieces of clay. Finally, place each ball in palm of hand and squish. Ball may be served as is or with chocolate milk. Makes two servings as a main course, or four as an appetizer!

Resident Suzanne Jones is the author of “Readable, Doable and Delicious: Requested Recipes and Stories from the Past to the Present”. For a number of years, Suzanne wrote a weekly column in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel titled “You Asked For It”. For more information about her book, visit (www.past-presentrecipes.com).

Recipe Corner: Ella Elvin’s Special Cheesecake

Strawberry-Cheesecake-with-Strawberry-SyrupThose of you of a certain age who can remember some of the culinary giants of the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s, including of course Julia Child and James Beard, and who lived anywhere near the East Coast, will recognize the name Ella Elvin.

Ella was the Food Editor for years at the New York Daily News and wrote a column called “Ask Ella”. Not long after I met Ella, we got on the subject of cheesecakes (one of my very favorite foods). She offered to send me one of her favorite recipes baked without a crust.

She mentioned that it had been published in her column in the 1980s and had received many glowing reports as you will attest to once you taste it.

This is truly a rich and satisfying cheesecake, one to be made for those special occasions when calories and cholesterol can be momentarily forgotten, and pure gustatory pleasures can take over. Though the cake can be served unadorned, it is even further enhanced by some fresh fruit, such as sliced strawberries or raspberries arranged on top.

The recipe serves 12, but Ella said it can be halved and baked in an 8-inch round cake pan. We advise you to make the full amount – otherwise you won’t have leftovers to savor.

1 pound creamed cottage cheese

1 pound original cream cheese, at room temp, cut into pieces

1-1/2 cups sugar

4 large eggs, lightly beaten

2 tablespoons lemon juice

Grated rind of one lemon

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon cornstarch

1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, melted

1 pint (2 cups) sour cream (not reduced or fat free)

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Grease a 9-inch spring-form pan and reserve. Ella said the recipe can be halved and baked in an 8-inch round cake pan for 45 minutes or until set in the center. Cool according to recipe.

In a food processor fitted with the metal blade, or a good blender, puree the cottage cheese until smooth. Remove to a large mixing bowl. Repeat the procedure with the cream cheese. Add to the cottage cheese, and with an electric mixer, beat in the sugar gradually. Add the eggs, lemon juice, grated rind and vanilla and mix well.

Stir the cornstarch and flour together, and beat into the cheese mixture. Add the butter and sour cream, and continue beating until well mixed. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, and bake in the center of the oven for one hour or until set in the center.

Turn off the oven, and leave the cake in the oven for two hours more. Remove from the oven, let come to room temperature, then chill thoroughly in the refrigerator before removing the rim of the pan. Makes 12 servings.

Resident Suzanne Jones is the author of “Readable, Doable and Delicious: Requested Recipes and Stories from the Past to the Present”. For a number of years, Suzanne wrote a weekly column in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel titled “You Asked For It”. For more information about her book, visit (www.past-presentrecipes.com).

Recipe Corner: Watercress Soup

soup-ct-1585356-lWould you believe that these small, crisp, slightly peppery, tasty little leaves, grown in water (and hence their name Watercress) are a hefty superfood? They are rich in vitamins A, C and K, contain more calcium per gram or ounce than milk and more iron than spinach, among other vitamins and antioxidants.

Years ago, while at Cuisinarts, we were asked for a recipe for Watercress Soup that could be either warm or chilled. Basing our research and development on a version of the classic French Potage au Cresson (watercress) recipe, which tends to be somewhat over-rich, we substituted ever-abundant zucchini for the classic potatoes and added just a bit of cream at the end to give it a smoothness otherwise missing.

Originally geared to the food processor, by hand or with a blender is just as satisfactory.

Do make sure you watercress is fresh and crisp with no yellow spots or wilting leaves. Older leaves unfortunately become bitter and will spoil the end result of this refreshing soup. And don’t stop with soup. Watercress leaves are outstanding in salads, pastas, sandwiches (beats the usual lettuce in your BLT), stir-fries and even dips. Once tried, this “superfood” will become a favorite.

2 large leeks (about eight ounces each)

2 medium zucchini (about one pound)

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

3 cups chicken broth (low-sodium, if desired)

1 bunch fresh watercress, rinsed and dried (about three ounces)

Salt and fresh ground white pepper, to taste

1/3 cup heavy cream

Trim the leeks of all green and the root ends. Cut through the leeks lengthwise, and rinse under running water to remove all grit. Slice into ¼-inch slices.

Trim the ends of the zucchini and slice into ¼-inch slices.

Melt the butter in a large, heavy saucepot over medium heat. Sauté the leeks until softened, about two minutes. Add the zucchini and sauté two minutes more. Add the broth; increase the heat to high to bring to a boil. Then lower the heat and simmer, covered, until the zucchini is very tender, about four minutes.

Trim the heavy stems from the watercress. Bring the soup again to a boil and add the watercress. Reduce the heat and simmer for about one minute.

Strain the soup, reserving the liquid. Puree the solids in a food processor fitted with the metal blade or a blender. Return the liquid to the saucepot and whisk in the pureed mixture. Season to taste, and just before serving, stir in the cream. If serving chilled, bring the mixture to room temperature, then add the cream and refrigerate, covered for several hours, or overnight.

Resident Suzanne Jones is the author of “Readable, Doable and Delicious: Requested Recipes and Stories from the Past to the Present”. For a number of years, Suzanne wrote a weekly column in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel titled “You Asked For It”. For more information about her book, visit (www.past-presentrecipes.com).

If you registered. All registrations have been removed due to spam issues.

Unfortunately we were getting a lot of registrations for users that weren’t real. So I’ve removed all “Subscriber” level registered users. At this time registration is not needed to view site content. If in the future special content is created that requires registered users, we will announce how you can get registered at that time.

Thanks,

Tom Roe
JKV Residents Administrator
troe@jkvfl.com